Terri Loewenthal

Terri's Psychscapes are single-exposure, in-camera compositions that utilize special optics developed by the artist. Her hope is that the hallucinogenic landscape images reintroduce the viewer to our national lands with the intent to inspire a greater awareness and appreciation.

Johanna Tagada

Johanna Tagada (b 1990, Strasbourg, France) is a painter and interdisciplinary artist working across London and Essex (UK), rural Alsace (France) and rural Tamil Nadu (India). Her practice composed of painting, drawing, installation, sculpture, film, photography and writing often conceals ecological messages, rendered in soft and delicate methods. In several of the artist’s projects interaction with the environment and others plays a central role. Solo exhibitions include Épistolaire Imaginaire – Merci at Galerie Jean-Francois Kaiser, and Take Care – き をつけて at Nidi Gallery. In 2014, Johanna founded the positive and collaborative cultural project Poetic Pastel, one inspired by the Deep Ecology movement and which includes amongst its collaborators Takashi Homma, Tate Modern Bookshop, Totodo, Tamsin Clark and Takeshi Hayatsu. In 2018, Johanna cofounded the publication series Journal du Thé – Contemporary Tea Culture with T. S. Wendelstein, it has been nominated at the 2018 Stack Awards.

Marko Umicevic

Marko Umicevic (b. 1982) is a photographic artist based in Zagreb, Croatia. His work focuses on experimental, analogue processes, involving self-designed cameras and camera-less techniques. His recent art has evolved towards mapping and abstract representation of natural environment, relying on nature as a sole force in image creation. Marko holds an MA Degree in Art History from the University of Zagreb. He exhibited across Europe, United States and has been featured online and in several publications.

Kristian Askelund

Kristian Askelund (b. 1984) works predominantly in the medium of mixed media paintings, but occasionally includes video, photography and sculpture in his practice. Between 2004 and 2011 Askelund completed one semester in Biotechnology, moved on to Film Directing and finally studied Fine Arts.

Jan Eric Visser

‘‘I have been transforming my everyday inorganic garbage items into autonomous works of art since 1987. Thus I have been exploring an ecologically driven aesthetics respectful of earth’s resources and the cycle of nature and life. Aspiring for an artistic reconciliation between concept, matter and activism my art practice challenges our contemporary understanding of matter and existence. My work may be seen as a unique personal footprint, raising notions of consummation and transience, enigma and exigency, art and life.’’

Molly Tucker

Combining her deep passion for geology and environmental issues, such as climate change and pollution, Tucker explores the tactility of cameraless photograms created in the landscape under direct sunlight on silver gelatin paper. As the photographic medium utilizes minerals and ores from the Earth, she embraces this cyclic nature of mining for silvers in the paper and changing their chemical composition once submerged into different toning baths. This process of mining for silvers has resonated deeply with Tucker as a conversation between her photography work and field investigations of geological & chemical changes to the environment. Primarily operating through alternative processes and cameraless photography, Tucker’s practice also includes lens based photography and post-photographic digital treatment of images.

Britt Walker

''My work explores the relationship between humans and nature; by combining the two I hope to demonstrate the devastating effects that we are having on the environment. For this series I focused on climate change and used recycled materials to create pieces to signify rising sea levels, melting ice caps and coral bleaching. Each work includes a human hand to symbolize how our actions impact the environment. My aim is to raise awareness of the importance of looking after our planet. I hope to inspire people to think about their connection with the environment, as well as their actions.’’

Séverine Bonacchi

‘‘My name is Séverine Bonacchi. I use both analog and digital photography, and sometimes collage, as a powerful tool for self-knowledge and self-acceptance, in order to find my own « why ». My process is mostly intuitive. I shoot because there is something I want to keep : a light, a gesture, an emotion, a texture, a shape, a line. It is often afterwards that I find some convergence and start to dig that way, willing to offer the viewer both a time of contemplation and an opportunity to make his/her own connections.’’