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Molly Tucker

Molly Tucker

‘‘When I was 14 years old, a dear friend’s mother, transformed my experience of geological specimen forever. Her words repeated in my mind like a skipping record; “Moll, you wouldn’t believe what rocks can tell us about the Earth and about ourselves. It’s all quite fascinating how much we rely on one another”. Refining my geological collection over the years, I began to question what drew me towards these unique & silent wonders from the Earth. Realizing just how much we rely on minerals and ores from the bedrock beneath our feet, my fascination with geology has since developed into an ongoing investigation of our interdependent relationship with the world of rocks. The extraction, exhaustion, use, abuse and abandonment of geological specimen and sites has become a pressing matter within my photographic work.

The Lumen printing process has become a critical component of my image making. My photograms examine the forms of discarded geological specimen as catalysts to explore chemical and geological transformations to the surface and atmosphere of the Earth. The images are a one off creation of mineral examination and varying exposure under sunlight in the landscape that can not be replicated. The abstract quality of my photographs becomes a shifting microscopic view of geologic forms and the macroscopic effect of the transformations to the surface and atmosphere of the Earth. Each image is as unique, unparalleled, and rare in their individual qualities quite like every geological specimen in my rock collection. ’’


Born in New York, Molly Tucker is an ecological artist and a amateur geologist currently residing in Portland, Maine. She is set to receive her BFA in photography from Maine College of Art in 2019. Growing up at the “foothills” of the Adirondack Park has influenced a large portion of Tucker’s life. In particular, the bare bedrock of “The Brothers” on Big Slide mountain is where Tucker’s admiration for physical geology is rooted. “The Brothers” provided her ground to photograph, speculate and uncover the complexities of minerals that lay dormant beneath her. The expansion of Tucker’s geological collection has allowed her to examine over 100 individual specimen and unearth an infatuation to study our interdependent relationship with rocks. Combining her deep passion for geology and environmental issues, such as climate change and pollution, Tucker explores the tactility of cameraless photograms created in the landscape under direct sunlight on silver gelatin paper. As the photographic medium utilizes minerals and ores from the Earth, she embraces this cyclic nature of mining for silvers in the paper and changing their chemical composition once submerged into different toning baths. This process of mining for silvers has resonated deeply with Tucker as a conversation between her photography work and field investigations of geological & chemical changes to the environment. Primarily operating through alternative processes and cameraless photography, Tucker’s practice also includes lens based photography and post-photographic digital treatment of images.

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Jan Eric Visser

Jan Eric Visser

Anouk van Kalmthout

Anouk van Kalmthout

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