Alternative fashion brands: the shortlist

It is important to acknowledge the rise of sustainability within the fashion industry; a number of people are opting for pre-loved or repurposed clothing. Nevertheless, fast fashion is still at the forefront for most.

For those who are searching for an eco-friendly source, we have devised a guide for alternative fashion options.

I AND ME is the London denim line designed to transcend seasons

Hailing from East London, UK, I AND ME make short-run denim garments that emphasize quality and design alongside the reduction of water, chemical, and electrical use in production. Their collections are small love poems to the present moment, aesthetic statements that bring wearability, durability, interest, and grace into cohesive pieces made to wear for life. Each line is sustainably made, with cuts and profiles that blend and blur gender binaries and focus on the natural beauties of the human body, fabric, and colours.

Nothing New

Nothing new is a fashion story by The Earth Issue, art directed and styled by Isabelle Landicho and photographed by Elena Cremona.

Shot in and around Tottenham, it is an exploration of how one can engage with sustainability in an urban environment. As a North London native, Isabelle harbours a personal connection to the photographs as this is the neighbourhood in which she lives and works, finding nature and inspiration within her everyday reality.

Critics say that it is difficult to engage with ethical fashion, that it is too expensive and elitist. All the clothing in the editorial is from the stylistʼs archive; nothing is bought or borrowed from brands, most of it has been sourced from charity shops, chuck outs or collected over the years.

The focal point is that we should cherish our clothes, refrain from buying new unless necessary and support responsible businesses if doing so.

Conscious fashion story by Fernando Torres

Conscious fashion story by Fernando Torres. “I’ve worked for some big brands with huge carbon footprints and wanted to do something that promoted a different option for people but also educate myself on how to make more sustainable choices. I imagined the shoot to represent a new generation of kids that have grown up in a post Greta Thurnberg, where buying something new just wasn’t cool anymore.“

Reduce: Rewear: Reclaim

‘Reduce: Rewear: Reclaim’ is an editorial that promotes conscious fashion by featuring second hand clothing. It calls on a Fashion Revolution as it actively participates in reducing waste, by re-wearing clothes that are already owned and reclaiming clothes that are pre-loved. ‘Reduce: Rewear: Reclaim’ affirms that we are protectors of the earth, understanding that it is our home and our responsibility to preserve it. With a creative team mainly made up of women and people of colour, the editorial increases racial, cultural and gender representation by celebrating diversity and inclusivity; it captures a love that empowers a generation who are mindful of the part we all play in creating a more sustainable, ethical world.

Denisse Ariana Pérez

Denisse Ariana Pérez is a Caribbean-born, Copenhagen-based copywriter, author and photographer. She is obsessed with words, people and imagery and finding ways to make them speak to one another.
Her photographic work has been featured on The Guardian, El Pais, VICE, Afropunk, Dazed, Ignant, Hunger, Paulette Magazine and Accent Magazine.

Geo Knits Slow

Slowing down the need to have instant gratification when creating something instantly or the instant buzz you feel when buying something new without thinking about it.  We have become so used to having everything so instantly and I feel for me it’s really not a healthy way to go. 

Using the spare time I had between working a day job and trying to be social I worked on this project over several months. By calling the project Geo Knits Slow- although it is an obvious comment on fast fashion, it also gave me the space to breathe within my work and not put so much pressure on receiving instant gratification. These garments are a labour of love for me and it doesn’t matter if I make something in 3 weeks or 3 months.

Where I End, You Begin

Inspiration is drawn through the comparison of the liberation of the female body and its earthly precedent, where questions of reflection, expansion, and empathy are brought to the surface, through the use of organic textures and colours reminiscent of dirt, grass, trees, brought by pieces sourced from sustainable brands, personal archives, and vintage and secondhand pieces. Jessica Gianelli is a London based freelance multidisciplinary visual storyteller working across photography, film, creative direction and writing. Her work explores the notion of identity and looks and to form a tactile link between what can be seen and what is felt. As a recent graduate from Istituto Marangoni London, Jessica is looking forward to upcoming collaborations, and embarking on a Fashion Communications Master’s Degree at Central Saint Martins.

Staying sustainable in the life of model-marine scientist

My name is Rae Rodriguez, well in the fashion world anyways. My mom calls me Désirée. I’m still not sure why they called me Rae, but I guess it’s worked out pretty well. I’m a Puerto Rican model with a degree in marine science, so naturally an environmental activist. I grew up between islands where I learned to care about the land and ocean as I watched our planet grow more and more polluted.

Fashion Editorials Open Call

FASHIONISTAS...

We don’t need to reiterate the stats. The fashion industry plays big part in the climate crisis and we need to be doing something about it.

Submissions are now open for conscious fashion editorials for #theearthissue online, the deadline is August 31st. Share and tag your friends!

We are accepting editorials that promote ethical, second hand and alternative fashion. Get creative and send your work either via a link in an email or attach it in a wetransfer link. Please include a statement about the work and a short bio about yourself.

Email isabelle@theearthissue.com with Conscious Fashion' as the subject header

#consciousfashion2019 🌱

Ethical Brands for Afro Hair

Having afro hair, I have grown up accepting the fact that if I needed to buy products it wasn’t as easy as popping into Superdrug or Tesco. I had to travel to a specialised store where the shelves were packed from floor to ceiling full of the latest brands mainly from the US. The shopping trip became much harder once I realised that the chemicals I was using to maintain my hair were toxic for my health and the environment.So after much research, trials of my own and label reading I have put together a list of some ethical brands to encourage more people to ditch the toxic products that could damage their health. In their place, I have picked some brands that carefully select their ingredients and are ethical in their practices.

Pretty Ugly Editorial

Pretty Ugly, shot on a sun ripened day in London. The premise of the shoot is to promote natural and cruelty free products.

The full editorial will be up on The Earth Issue website later today.

Credits:
Producer and Art Direction: Isabelle Landicho
Photographer: Elena Cremona
Assistant & Video Editor: Dipo Kayode- Osi
Make-Up Artist: Gina Blondell
Hair Stylist: Shelley Sumner
Casting: Christie Phedon
Models: Anesu & Nathan

Pretty Ugly (BTS)

Pretty Ugly, shot on a sun ripened day in London. The premise of the shoot is to promote natural and cruelty free products.

The full editorial will be up on The Earth Issue website later today.

Credits:
Producer and Art Direction: Isabelle Landicho
Photographer: Elena Cremona
Assistant & Video Editor: Dipo Kayode- Osi
Make-Up Artist: Gina Blondell
Hair Stylist: Shelley Sumner
Casting: Christie Phedon
Models: Anesu & Nathan

Top Ten Ethical Beauty Products for Summer 2019

Can ethical beauty tick all the boxes? Organic, natural, cruelty-free, vegan, palm oil-free, halal, ethically sourced and plastic-free packaging? This is a question I’ve asked myself in the last couple of years and as a makeup artist in the fashion industry these are all things I deeply care about… Here are the top ten ethical beauty products to reach for this summer. Products that will leave us feeling fresh and ready for sunny adventures and what’s more, they won't cost the earth.

Little Plant Pantry

Maria Romanova Hynes and Winter Romanov from Little Plant Pantry, moved from rural Ireland to Amsterdam early last year, to open the city’s first zero-waste shop. We sat in their garden, newly built within ten days with the help of volunteers, and talked about their journey towards a sustainable urban existence, the harsh reality of the food industry and the challenges and joys of running your own shop.