Climate Change Coloring Book

Climate Change Coloring Book

 
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Coloring books are supposed to calm your nerves and help you unplug from the daily hustle. But this Kickstarter campaign wants to bring you a coloring book about one of the most anxiety-inducing issues of our century: climate change.

Instead of coloring intricate shapes or animals, you can trace the extent of Arctic sea ice 20 years ago and see what was lost since then, color a year of air pollution in Beijing, or fill in the parts of Manhattan that would be eaten away by rising sea levels. It might not sound like your typical, meditative coloring book — but it’s also not really supposed to be, says Brian Foo, the 31-year-old data artist and computer scientist behind the project.
— Alessandra Potenza, The Verge
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Climate change is one of the most significant issues that uniquely affects everyone around the globe. There currently is a significantly large gap between scientific consensus and public perception of climate change. Since public perception influences government and business policies around environmental issues, it is important to ensure enough unbiased and reliable information about the issues are available to the public.
— Brian Foo
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Book details

  • 40 pages with over 20 coloring activities accompanied by written descriptions of the research and sources
  • Coloring activities include the causes and effects of climate change as well as solutions to reduce climate change
  • Printed by a local eco-friendly printing company
  • Heavy, high-quality, 100% recycled paper
  • Vegetable-based, non-toxic ink
  • 8.5 x 11 inches
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More info can be found on www.coloringclimate.com, where you can also yourself up a copy.

 
The New Environmentalists -  INDIE magazine

The New Environmentalists - INDIE magazine

Climate change and how this artist sheds light on it’s darkness - Material Magazine

Climate change and how this artist sheds light on it’s darkness - Material Magazine

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