Take it to the Streets: NEVERCREW's large-scale murals highlight the effect of humans on the natural world

Take it to the Streets: NEVERCREW's large-scale murals highlight the effect of humans on the natural world

 

Words by Niels Carlyle
An Article published in The Earth Issue 002: IMPACT

Nature is both powerful and delicate, and so is humankind.
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Creating large-scale visual pieces, the dexterous double that form NEVERCREW, provides an interpretation of the natural world and how we relate to it as humans, contrasting natural elements with pieces of machinery in their murals.

Using images of large endangered animals that are greatly impacted by climate change, such as bears, polar bears and cetaceans who are ''suffering the environmental changes'', NEVERCREW aspire to broaden the discussion on the environmental crisis and directly communicate with the viewer.


Adding to the images of animals, the artists also depict a range of different natural resources throughout their work; oil, quartz, rocks, icebergs and metals are all represented in their murals to connect the smaller machine fragments in order to complete the conversation. The finished mural evokes a ''system'' contrasting ''environmental icons'' with human components responsible for the ''issues affecting our present time''.

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The approach to their work - as well as its execution - depends on the harmony of both individuals. The intimate relationship between two artists reflects the time they've spend synchronising their styles, attempting to ''merge the ideas and feelings'' of one another's individuality. Twenty-one years of collaborative work is expressed in a creative form of visual communication that has combined the work and minds of two artists.

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Reluctant to pigeonhole themselves, they steer away from self-descriptions, to be as free as possible in their creative process. They believe that ''visual art has the power of touching more levels at the same time. Art has, in general, the chance to cross the lines of institutional languages, both verbal and visual, touching emotions, stimulating ideas in a way that at the same time is instinctive and thoughtful, to propose alternative views to the ones that are habitual and strictly bound by the system''.
They draw inspiration from literary greats such as Kafka, Thoreau, Kerouac and Douglas Adams, and are influences by avant-garde and surrealist artists such as Magritte, Manzoni and Brenton. Specifically mentioned by the duo was Joseph Beuys for his ''relationship with nature'' and his ''idea of concrete utopia and social sculpture''.

 
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