Issue 003: MANIFESTO 

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The Earth Issue 003: MANIFESTO - a collaborative effort by The Earth Issue and Archive Collective

“LIFT UP YOUR HEADS!”
— F.T Marinetti’s

So concludes “The Founding and Manifesto of Futurism,” F.T Marinetti’s avant-garde guide to plunging headfirst into an uncompromised life, a life fully immersed in art, love, poetry and fearlessness. The art-manifesto, or rather, the art of the manifesto, has served as a prototype for decades of intention-setting to come; free-flowing back and forth between the creative arts and advertising, politics, feminism, and - of late, the absurdist realms of digital media. A manifesto is prescriptive. It is fervent, but mutant. It can be as stoic or light-hearted as you, the reader, make it out to be.

Where better to appropriate the urgent didacticism of the manifesto than into the complicated and escalating conversation about the environmental crisis? Most of us wish we could do something - something more, but we feel powerless in our individualism and limited by the smallness of our actions. Where do we start? How do fight against the destruction of our environment, in a way which feels sincere and effective? This is where the crippling paradoxes arise, and for many of us, the point at which we lose hope and abandon ship. The manifesto serves as an antithesis to helplessness. It is, by nature, a roadmap designed for personal use.

MANIFESTO takes direct inspiration from artists, writers and other creatives who have, to one extent or another, authentically aligned their environmentalism and their creative practice. It looks at ways in which day to day actions can be sustainable, joyful, and in-line with one’s craft.

The first chapter of MANIFESTO we delved into the idea of journeys near and far, as the basis of eco-creative projects. We featured a photographer who traversed the prairies and Great Plains of the United States, including her home state of Nebraska, to highlight biological diversity and push for conservation. This chapter also includes the work of an illustrator who collects botanical relics while exploring her city of Buenos Aires, a French artist’s photographic travel-journal from the wilderness of Bali and Java, and a Canadian photographer’s documentation of the remarkable geologically-active ecosystem of North Island and Whakaari, New Zealand. In order to limit the environmental damage of our wanderlust as a global society, it is for important for us to redefine and expand our definition of “travel” to include all kinds of purposeful engagement with the landscape, including local expeditions that do not require air transport. Songlines of the Here and Now is an inspiring example of how an artist has engaged with the cultural, geophysical, and mythical complexities of a landscape, by slowly tracing the ancient Aboriginal maps of Australia and capturing narratives along the way.

Chapter two highlights the work of seven artists who have committed to using l’objet trouvé: found, foraged, recycled, or environmentally friendly materials in their artwork. This includes; sculptures made from found geological materials, pigments from foraged urban plants, botanical textile dyes, sculptures from discarded objects and modern basketry woven from the natural landscape. Finally, a practical guide to exiting the consumerist hamster-wheel of fast fashion.

In chapter three of MANIFESTO examines the intersection of art and food, because what you choose to put on your plate is both a political and ecological decision. We look at some instances in which sustainable food production and consumption has been successfully merged with creative work. We were incredibly fortunate to hear from an artist whose work begins with site specific research into local food production and wild edible plants, and culminates with a multi-sensory dining experience bringing together community over a meal of foraged ingredients. We also spoke to a writer who found peace and fulfilment dedicating her life to a permaculture farm in South India.

The option of leaving the city, of course, is not available to everyone and for this reason we also made sure to include the voices of urban farmers in our fourth section on gardens. Gardening, like cooking, is a creative endeavour that brings beauty and joy into our lives, and, if done well, can manifest positive change within our local environment. Chapter three peeks into the garden of a Viennese artist whose labour of love, her garden, has morphed into an open-air art studio, a space for inspiration and relaxation, a space to share ideas and experiment - as well as the source of her food all summer. It also features the work of a graphic designer who introduces elements from her garden into her surrealist sculptural works, and a visual artist who creates botanical still life installations at various art residencies around the world. Finally, four urban farmers give us some tips on building an urban garden on a balcony, rooftop, or at a community greenhouse.

In these pages, you will also find a tale of a wild sisterhood, a bright green bookshelf, and a wardrobe designed to treat our planet with tenderness.

Collaborators:
Alex Bateman, Alisa Tanaka-King, Charlotte Ellis, Chiara Zonca, Christi York, Dennis DeHart, Elena Cremona, Elizabeth Fleur Willis, Ellie Irons, Hannah Rowan, Isabelle Landicho, Jayne Goldheart, Leah Abraham, Madeline Cass, Maela Ohana, Maria Montiel, Marga Karayol ,Martin Gisborne, May Hands, Megan Mericle, Mia Middleton, Michaela Altweger, Mira Loew, Molly Tucker, Nyima Ohana, Ofer Gensler, Priyanka Shah, Sheena Swirlz, Simrit Malhi, Sophia Nicolov, Stanislas Motz, Tanya Houghton

Specifications:
Debossed cover, A4, 204 pages, offset print using non-soya vegetable oil-based inks, perfect bound, full colour on 100% recycled uncoated paper.

About our printers:
Anglia Print Ltd
http://www.angliaprint.co.uk/

Powered by 100% renewable energy with investment in waterless printing presses, using non-soya vegetable oil based inks and a zero waste to landfill policy since 2005, Anglia print have eliminated the use of all hazardous substances and water in production. Being certified Carbon Neutral, they use materials from eco-friendly, ethically and environmentally certified sources: 95% (by volume) of material purchased are Forest Stewardship Council®-certified or recycled.


               Issue 002: IMPACT

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The Earth Issue 002: IMPACT – a collaborative effort by The Earth Issue and Archive Collective.

Our second issue unpacks two forms of “impact”: both the positive and negative traces left by humanity on its natural environment in the context of the anthropocene, and the possibilities for environmentalist impact at the conjunction of art and activism.

As media consumption becomes increasingly fragmented, divisive, and delivered in indigestible portions of scrolling, statistics, news and op-eds, the simple act of switching off and pulling back from public discourse presents itself as an attractive alternative to the political fray. If there’s one thing we’ve learnt from our interviews with artists and ecologists while putting together this issue, it’s this: the most effective breed of environmentalism starts at home, so to speak, in cultivating a personal philosophy centered around applied ecology and purpose-driven, conscious engagement with one’s environment.

In his essay, Dark Ecology, Paul Kingsnorth proposes a list of solutions that would “not be a waste of time” when it comes to conservation, and they are all rooted at the individual, practical level. Withdrawing: to “allow yourself to sit back quietly and feel, intuit, working out what is right for you and what nature might need from you.” Rewilding land, planting a garden, creating places or networks that act as refuges, getting your hands dirty, grounding yourself in things and places, remembering that everything has intrinsic value, beyond utility, sitting on grass, touching a tree, walking into the hills, marveling at “what the hell this thing called life could possible be..”

Over the course of this issue, we chose to steer clear of doomsday perspectives and to instead address the many inspiring ways in which creative individuals or micro-communities are shaping a more harmonious connection with the natural world.

Collaborators:
NEVERCREW, Zaria Forman, Jason deCaires Taylor, Jonas Marguet, Aloha Bonser Shaw, Andres Donadio, Carlos Jiménez, CLOAAT, Martyna Wójcik-Śmierska, HEMPEN, Toca Do Coelho, Victoria Fuller, Joana Sequeria, Leah Abraham, Niels Carlyle, Matthieu Lavanchy, Benjamin Eagle, Patrick Roberts, Tomoki Yamauchi, Elizabeth Fleur Willis

Specifications:
89 pages, offset print using non-soya vegetable oil based inks, perfect bound, full colour on 100% recycled paper.

About our printers:
Anglia Print Ltd
http://www.angliaprint.co.uk/

Powered by 100% renewable energy with investment in waterless printing presses, using non-soya vegetable oil based inks and a zero waste to landfill policy since 2005, Anglia print have eliminated the use of all hazardous substances and water in production. Being certified Carbon Neutral, they use materials from eco-friendly, ethically and environmentally certified sources: 95% (by volume) of material purchased are Forest Stewardship Council®-certified or recycled.

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Age of Man

There is a growing consensus today, that we are living in an age where the earth has been so deeply impacted by humanity, that a new geologic epoch–the Anthropocene–needs to the declared. The Anthropocene, or the ‘Age of Man’ is believed to have begun in the year 1950, and can be visualised as a distinct and heavy footprint on the earth. Furthermore, this footprint has been etched and defined by the prickly residues of our industrialisation, technological advancement, and rampant consumer culture.
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This supports the belief that designers are well-aligned to play a leading role in shaping our future attitude towards natural resources, production processes and the consumption of goods. And it is this belief, that is at the heart of Form&Seek’s ‘Age of Man’ exhibit, where the talented and diverse collective of designers and artists will present their compelling visions for the future, and design solutions that are best suited for our age


Extract from Age of Man FOREWORD
written by Purva Chawla - Founder & Editor at MaterialDriven

A collaboration between The Earth Issue, Archive Collective, Form&Seek & MaterialDriven - The "Age of Man" mini-issue examines the Age of Man show by Form&Seek at the Ventura Projects area of Milan Design Week 2017. The foreword written by MaterialDriven's founder, Purva Chawla, introduces the theme of the exhibit and the responses from the 30 designers and artists showcased within the issue and at the Age of Man exhibit.

16 paged, riso-printed (an environmentally friendlier print process using soy-based inks) and saddle stitch bound, 2 colour on uncoated pink evercolour paper (100% recycled paper stock). Printed in London by Hato Press

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Issue 001

 

After much toil and anticipation, we’re proud to present The Earth Issue 001!

The Earth Issue 001 is our first printed issue; a collaborative effort by The Earth Issue collective and Archive Collective. It focuses on the intersection between fine art and environmentalism, exploring our relationship with the natural world through a range of creative media from, film photography to ceramic sculpture and performance art.

The Earth Issue 001 features the work of 28 up-and-coming and established artists, photographers, writers and designers. In common, they share a dedication to honouring the beauty of nature through their work, using art as a driving force for environmental activism. The collaborators of this publication aim to highlight a growing interest amongst young artists to awaken society’s complacent consciousness towards the environment; to inspire and harness the power of social change.

The creative projects brought together in this publication are a glimpse into the diverse possibilities for work at the intersection of art and environmental sustainability. Through acts of inspiration and activism, photographers, writers, painters, and artists have the power to bring environmentalist initiatives to the forefront of cultural discourse. “The Earth Issue” is a celebration of the creative intersection between art and environmentalism, and we hope that it can serve as inspiration for future collaborations and discussions on the topic.

90 page, litho-printed an perfect bound, full colour on recycled paper. Worldwide shipping.

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Read news and media about Issue 001 here.